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ESBJÖRN HÖRNBERG, MBA

President of the World Federation Against Drugs, WFAD

Presentation Title: Civil Society’s Commitment and the Way Forward

Mr. Esbjörn Hörnberg, MBA, Swedish citizen, born in 1948.

In May 2018 I was elected President of the World Federation Against Drugs, WFAD, a global multilateral community of more than 200 non-governmental organizations and individuals.

From 2003 I serve as the Executive Director of IOGT International, the premier global network for evidence-based policy measures and community-based interventions to prevent and reduce harm caused by alcohol and other drugs.

Up till March 2018 I was the Chairperson of the Vienna NGO Committee on Drugs and also the Chair of the Civil Society Task Force on Drugs, set up as the key entity to secure Civil Societies engagement and coordination in order to effectively include Civil Society Organisations voices in the UNGASS on Drugs 2016.

From 1994 to September 2018 I was Secretary General/Senior Advisor of International Institute of the IOGT-NTO-movement, a foundation working with development in Africa, South- and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe and the Balkans.

And way back in history, I was secretary in the civil society group working with WHO and UNODC on the project “Global Initiative” 1991 – 1996, specially targeting affected and vulnerable Communities and Street Children.

Before working with international and development issues, I spent 17 years as a civil servant, in the sectors of education, social welfare and community administration.

ESBJÖRN HÖRNBERG, MBA

President of the World Federation Against Drugs, WFAD

Presentation Title:
Civil Society’s Commitment and the Way Forward

Mr. Esbjörn Hörnberg, MBA, Swedish citizen, born in 1948.

In May 2018 I was elected President of the World Federation Against Drugs, WFAD, a global multilateral community of more than 200 non-governmental organizations and individuals.

From 2003 I serve as the Executive Director of IOGT International, the premier global network for evidence-based policy measures and community-based interventions to prevent and reduce harm caused by alcohol and other drugs.

Up till March 2018 I was the Chairperson of the Vienna NGO Committee on Drugs and also the Chair of the Civil Society Task Force on Drugs, set up as the key entity to secure Civil Societies engagement and coordination in order to effectively include Civil Society Organisations voices in the UNGASS on Drugs 2016.

From 1994 to September 2018 I was Secretary General/Senior Advisor of International Institute of the IOGT-NTO-movement, a foundation working with development in Africa, South- and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe and the Balkans.

And way back in history, I was secretary in the civil society group working with WHO and UNODC on the project “Global Initiative” 1991 – 1996, specially targeting affected and vulnerable Communities and Street Children.

Before working with international and development issues, I spent 17 years as a civil servant, in the sectors of education, social welfare and community administration.

PRESENTATION SUMMARY

Civil Society’s Commitment and the Way Forward

In the UNODC World Drug Report 2019 there is estimation that

  • 188 Million people are using Cannabis
  • 53 Million people are using Opioids
  • 29 Million people are using Amphetamine Types
  • 21 Million people are using Ecstacy
  • 18 Million people are using Cocaine

But, UNODC also estimates that 4,6 billion adults around the globe are choosing a drug free life. That is more than 94 % of the world’s population in the age between 15 and 64 who did not use drugs the last 12 months.

Despite such a strikingly low prevalence, out of 43 risk factors, drug use was nineteenth in the ranking of the top global killers (tobacco was second, and alcohol was third).

The costs of harm in terms of human lives, health, public safety, environment and GDP are disproportionate and already far too high for us to stand idly by and watch. Inaction may result in much higher levels of drug-related harm in the future.

There is no reason to wait or hesitate. Governments and civil society have effective and evidence-based measures at hand.

Growing scientific evidence provides insight into causes and consequences of drug use. We know the risk and protective factors leading to or discouraging people from drug use. We have sufficient knowledge about drug addiction, better understanding about what works in prevention and treatment as well as insights gained from the real-life experiments of cannabis legalization.

Given the harm drug use causes, tackling the world drug problem has been recognized as a priority of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Governments have committed to “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages” by strengthening the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol in target 3.5.

Today we live in a world of contrasts. In a world of abundance and scarcity, the world drug problem is no exception. On the one hand, we are flooded by prescription drugs especially in high-income countries and on the other hand, there is a lack of access to essential medications in low- and middle-income countries.

Furthermore, in some cases young people use drugs in order to add excitement to their lives not knowing what else to do and in others, poverty fuels drug use among those living in extreme conditions who as well do not know what else to do.

Copyright © 2020 D.A.R.E. America. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2020 D.A.R.E. America.
All Rights Reserved.